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20121205
20121213
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a little bit like this. now, it's a little bit warmer than the environment. how quickly does it cool? not very quickly because delta t is very small. if i put this in an oven and turn it red hot, take it outside. [makes sounds] this thing starts cooling like mad, okay? i mean, let's suppose every-- by you hear click, click, click, okay? red hot, click, click, click, click, click, click, click, click, click, click, click, click, click, see? one hot, click, click, make sense? it makes sense doesn't it? very, very--things that very, very hot compared to surrounding will cool out quickly. things that aren't so hot don't cool up so quickly, huh? so that's kinda make sense. if you got a can of beer or something, you wanna cool it down quickly. you put it in a fridge, someone says, "no, no. put it in a freezer, it'll cool faster." you say, "well, honey, if it gets down "to what the fridge is that's good enough. i'll just leave it in a fridge." who's right? put it in a fridge or the freezer, you wanna cool it faster. how many say same-same? if you wait five minutes it's the same. check your
: this balancing act must take place in an environment that is more resilient than scientists once thought. ate pressures on t forestse tha: thgi th include further drying provoked by deforestatio by el niño, by global warming. they include extensive agriculture, which provides abundant sources of ignition for forests that are rendered flammable by drought or by logging. and all of those are coming together in an expanding frontier that's going to move up along the roads that are being paved into the heart of the world's largest rain forest. captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org annenberg media ♪ for information about this and other annenberg media programs call 1-800-learner and visit us at www.learner.org.
appealed to him, and they didn't now. finding neither subjects nor an artistic environment that suited him, he left london and traveled 275 miles to the north. he settled in the small fishing village of cullercoats on the north sea and rented a studio two houses from the rescue station, overlooking the beach. here was his first encounter with the wild and elemental forces of nature. the rhythm of life in cullercoats was termined by the fishing boats, which set out at dusk and returned in the morning. gradually, homer began to replace descriptive detail with the concentrated drama of individuals bent on the task of survival in a rugged environment. although he had intended to stay in cullercoats only for the summer, he remained almost two years. in october, he watched the life brigade rescue the crew of a wrecked ship-- the iron crown. he sketched the scene from the beach and later painted one of his largest and most ambitious watercolors. at cullercoats, homer's works took on a new monumentality. in the lives of the fisherwomen, he perceived both the gravity of the human condition and the
into some other balls, such that the ball will slow down, would you throw the ball into an environment of heavy balls or light balls? heavy balls. and you want the thing to slow down. let me ask you this. if i take a ball and i throw it against a brick wall-- [makes sounds] --when it bounces off, will it bounce off a lot slower or about the same? about the same. about the same. if i take a golf ball and i throw it against a bowling ball, is that bowling ball gonna slow the golf ball down? no, it's not. so what you do is you take the golf ball and you throw into an arena of ping-pong balls. and if you do that, it will give what? give the energy to ping-pong ball and it itself will slow down. and so what do you do is you take these things and you bounce them off atoms like the size of carbon. did you ever hear about the heavy water? you bounce them off light atoms or molecules and these things will slow down, so they're moderated and will cause the reaction of more of this fission. you call--nuclear fission, gang, breaking apart, nuclear fission, and you will fission more atoms. anyway,
started disappearing and dying off because they were not changing with the environment, but other animals came in in its place and started taking over. that's why we have these fossils. >> so, these fossils were stuck in all of these layers-- >> yes. >> --that we're seein' today when we hiked around red rock canyon. >> exactly. exactly. >> wow. it's an amazing story that is told right here. you're summing up something that happened-- how many years ago these animals were here? >> we are looking at these animals found here were from about 10,000 years but we can go almost back to the periods where the pleistocene almost about a millions years ago. >> really? >> yes. >> so the fossil history, the animal history of this part of california goes way back. >> way back. >> and thank goodness, it's been preserved. >> yes, definitely. >> and thank goodness, caltrans is still finding this stuff when it's widening highways. >> exactly. that's where most of the finds come from, accidentally. >> okay. we have left the visitor's center. and what makes this whole adventure so interesting is that everyw
effective agricultural environment around fez within, say, 15 or 20 miles radius. but you also had very effective forms of nonhuman transport -- donkeys, camels, horses, mules -- that could bring in all of the kinds of supplies that the city needed. now, that's one reason why you had such high population densities. one of the effects of really high population densities, of course, is to create very dense urban markets, lots of consumers concentrated in small spaces. and this is one of the reasons why fez has such a high degree of urban specialization. keach: as in ancient ostia, almost everyone in fez is a full-time specialist. in the tanning industry alone, there are some 20 specialized activities required to process skins into leather. there are washers and hair removers, buyers and sellers, and transport specialists. there are even specialties within a specialty. there are people who handle the donkeys that bring skins into the market, while others handle the donkeys taking skins out. this is a hair removing factory. it is run by mr. abdelrrahman ovadghiri. interpreter: we get up ear
the things in our environment here, aren't this, this, this, all these things the same temperature? what if this book were hotter? what would it do to the table? energy would cascade from the book to the table until they both became the same temperature and they will level off. so that alcohol that's poured on your back has the same temperature as anything else around, but it feels cold. and why does it feel cold, gang? because what is that alcohol doing? what it's doing is what we're gonna be talking about today. it's changing state. it's changing from the liquid state to the gaseous state, okay? and we call that what? begin with ev? evaporation. evaporation, that's right. and we're gonna be learning that evaporation is a cooling process. you know, sometimes you're swimming and you come out and you're all wet, a little breeze come by and you feel kinda chilly. but if no breeze comes by, you don't feel so chilly. and what's going on? when that breeze comes by, what happens to the water on your body? evaporates. it evaporates. when it evaporates, how does your body feel? begin with a c. -
the environment and activities to inspire an appreciation for words, story telling, and communication in all their forms. but while reading lots of wonderful books to our children is essential, there's much more to literacy besides books. man: shall we read it? let's read it. "when i grow up, my job will be "to go to school and to drink and eat. "i will sell money if i pay money. "if you go to the store, if you buy food. "i can play on the big swing if i pay money. "if you don't, you'll have to go to jail. it's at central park. we can eat on a picnic." all right. anything else? hendrick: we can also convey to our children how satisfying and useful the written word is throughout the entire day. we can do this by writing down children's stories at group time, taking their dictation as they paint, helping children dictate and decorate letters to each other or to their parents, or adding written materials such as signs, phone books, and menus to their pretend play. teacher: are you ready for to write down what you see? what did you see? a purple... girl: cat! a purple cat? ok. it's going to say
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8